Stereotactic radiotherapy

Stereotactic radiotherapy

Stereotactic Radiotherapy (SRT), when applied to intracranial targets (SRS) is a non-invasive therapeutic modality whose objective is the treatment of deep lesions, up to 3 cm in diameter, through many precisely focused radiation beams. The volumes to be treated are well-located targets with well-defined limits, which are involved with stereotaxic precision in a single, high dose of focal radiation, preserving the normal tissue and other adjacent structures.

Thus, a fundamental characteristic of this technique, which distinguishes it from conventional External Radiation Therapy is the ability to induce a radiobiological effect on stereotaxically located intracranial targets, by obtaining a high dose gradient beyond the limits of the lesion, that is, maximum economy of neighboring tissues, which lowers the risk of side effects.

Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is also used to treat tumors and other lesions of the neck, lungs, liver, spine and other parts of the body. SRT for the brain and spine is typically completed in a single session, while SBRT is used to treat lung, liver, adrenal and other soft tissue tumors, and the treatment typically involves multiple (three to five) sessions.

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